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Features

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — No matter where the disaster may strike, the Southern Baptist Disaster Relief Team is there.

    This time, though, the disaster struck a little closer to home to Feeding Coordinator Karen Smith.

    “I wasn’t excited because it means friends are hurting but it feels good that we can provide for our neighbors,” she said.

    The last time the disaster relief team set up in Bullitt County was after the 1996 tornados hit the area.

  •   SHEPHERDSVILLE - Anyone with property along the Salt River tends to see their location as a curse during floods.

    A local church has taken what could be considered a curse and turned it into a blessing.

    Mercy Hill Church in Shepherdsville received substantial water damage to its building infrastructure during the recent high water event. The church moved into the old Troutman Dry Goods store located on Joe B. Hall Avenue.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — Residents of all ages gathered at Paroquet Springs Conference Center recently to learn how to keep those hearts healthy.

    Bullitt County Health Department Health Educator Liz McGuire opened the annual Healthy Hearts Wear Red luncheon by saying the health department’s county assessment continues to show the county’s largest areas of concern are heart problems and strokes.

    “Our mission is prevention,” she said.

  •  These photographs were taken by “Ms. Allen,” a neighbor, as she captured William E. Armstrong riding his horse with a cup of coffee through the flood waters of 1997.  These were made from the front porch of her residence at the intersection of Highway 61 and Highway 1494 (Beech Grove Road), Lebanon Junction.  

    Mr. Armstrong recalls that, when he woke up on this particular morning, the flood waters had backed up to the back of his barn and surrounded his property. 

  •  Photographer Wayne Bonnett went airborne to capture this picture of the Salt River at Highway 61.

    You can see that the water is over its banks, nearing the Highway 61 bridge. Preston Highway would be shut down just north of the river.

    Schools were cancelled on Monday due to numerous roads blocked by water.

    Check for more flood photos in the multimedia section of www.pioneernews.net, and subit your flood photos to editor@pioneernews.net

  •  Kentucky students who attend private or home schools have free access to Individual Learning Plans from the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority.

    KHEAA works with Career Cruising, which provides the ILP the state uses in all public schools, to give private and home school students in grades 6 through 12 the same planning tool.

    ILPs let students explore careers, set up education plans, create résumés and establish personal goals to become college and career ready.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON — So easy a dog can do it.

    That’s the premise behind the Kasey Fire Protection Program.

    Retired firefighter and paramedic of 31 years Jeff Owens started the Kasey Program over 25 years ago with his trusty black lab, Kasey, to teach elementary aged students how to react in case they’re ever in a fiery situation.

    An Indiana native, Owens recently visited Mount Washington, Roby and Maryville Elementary with Kasey and his rescuer-in-training, Kali.

  •  The Bullitt Central Beta Club recently competed at the state convention in Lexington.

    The students competed in various competitions, including academic, literary displays, arts and crafts, on-site public speaking and creative writing and talent.

    Those students honored include:

    *Jamisen McCrary -- first place in fiber arts and third place in ninth grade science testing

    *Ian Rock -- first place in ninth grade social studies testing

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON — Though it has evolved greatly over the past thousands of years, ancient Greek culture still plays a large part in today’s society. Students at Eastside Middle were given the opportunity to learn about it first hand: creating a museum for their classmates to visit.

    “When talking with the students, we realized many of them had never been to a museum before,” seventh grade social studies teacher Lauren Burress said.

  •  Bullitt County Public Library is working to develop a three-year Strategic Plan and would greatly appreciate your input. To that end, the Library has created a community survey aimed at learning more about individual community members and how the Library’s services and programs can be expanded and improved to better meet their needs.

  •  Mount Washington Mayor Barry Armstrong saw his shadow and more on a private tour of the Second Chances Wildlife Center on Groundhog’s Day.

    The center rehabs wildlife throughout the year but keeps a handful who can’t be released back into the wild as educational animals.

    Founder and Executive Director Brigette Brouillard woke one of the educational animals, a groundhog named Major, to celebrate his day.

  •  As snow accumulated, students picked up cameras and captured its scenic beauty in the third annual Snowmageddon Photo Contest sponsored by the Shepherdsville/Nichols Elementary School Family Resource Centers.

    Students had three days (Jan. 16-18) to take pictures in the themed Winter Wonderland contest.

    Coordinator Traci Gould said this was her third year facilitating the contest.

  •   LOUISVILLE -- A movie with Bullitt County as its title will have a showing on Wednesday, Feb. 7, in eastern Jefferson County.

    “Bullitt County” saw its debut in August at the Austin Film Festival and is now being shown at one-night screenings in Kentucky and southern Indiana.

    The film centers around a group of four friends in 1977 who detour from a bachelor party touring the Bourbon Trail to hunt for buried Prohibition money.

  • Serving the past decade as the field representative for U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, Steve Miller was honored Thursday as he announced his retirement at the end of the month.

    Miller was honored with stories from Bullitt Countians he has gotten to know over the years.

    Kylie Foushee was introduced as the county’s new field representative.

  •   A paper helicopter sounds simple on the surface.

    However, when you are up against a deadline, must follow the constraints of using specific building materials and the helicopter must stay in the air a certain amount of time and land closest to a target, then that becomes a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Challenge.

    Middle and high school students gathered recently at Eastside Middle School to put their STEM skills to the test.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — Flowers are normally sent during a time of mourning to comfort those who have lost a loved one. Unfortunately for those with pets, the grieving process isn’t quite the same.

    Hoping to help those who have lost their pets, Mount Washington Girl Scouts Makayla Stone and Alexis Sink set out to build a flower garden at Pet Haven Cemetery in Shepherdsville.

    The garden idea came as the friends brainstormed projects to help them earn their Silver Award, a requirement for middle-school aged scouts.

  •  LEBANON JUNCTION — A trucker’s life is full of movement: living a life on the road can make finding stability difficult and trying to find a regular church to attend can seem impossible.

    That’s where Truckstop Ministries comes into play.

    Created in 1981 by a retired truck driver, Truckstop Ministries is designed to give the on-the-go lifestyle of a truck driver a bit of consistency no matter which city they find themselves in on any given Sunday.

  •  NICHOLS - They were all wigging out at Nichols Elementary, but for a good cause.

    Two teachers, two students, and two relatives all had their long hair cut as donations for Locks of Love, an organization devoted to making wigs for young people dealing with cancer.

    Also, the school collected donations for the annual Bullitt County Relay for Life with a contest between teacher Amy Ferrell and and volunteer coordinator Cheri Mattingly.

  •  Winter has already sent cold weather to the county but on Friday it sent a little snow.

    While city, county and state workers were clearing streets on Saturday, it was a time for some sledding at the Shepherdsville City Park.

    Bullitt County Public Schools closed on Friday and again on Tuesday due to the severe weather (Monday was closed for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday).

    The cold snap will continue throughout the week, with temperatures in the single digits mid-week, accompanied by wind chills below zero.

  •  Student Technology Leadership Program (STLP) teams from Maryville and Roby Elementary Schools and an Eastside Middle School youth have qualified for state finals March 2018 at Rupp Arena in Lexington.

    Maryville’s STLP Coordinator Kimberly Tabler said her group’s project was on bully prevention.