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Opinion

  •  It is midway through the Bullitt County Fair but there is plenty of time to go out and enjoy the many sights and sounds.

    The annual fair, which is operated and run by a totally volunteer board, runs through Saturday evening.

    This year, visitors will see some improvements to the facility, especially those watching the various pageants under the pavilion.

    When your major revenue generator is subject to the wishes of Mother Nature, it is difficult to predict the success of your county fair.

  •  Maybe it was a final effort to make a difference.

    Superintendent Dr. Keith Davis recently proposed a “no fee” zone for elementary and middle school students.

    The idea was pretty simple -- students would not be required to go out and purchase school supplies for their elementary and middle school years.

    They would also not be subjected to any class fees -- with the exception of Chromebooks and some field trips.

  • Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for June 2018! 

  •  George Tanner was born 1879 in Hardin County, Kentucky.  His father and mother were John Tanner and Henrietta Graham.  Henrietta was born in 1838 in South Carolina. She was the daughter of Henry Graham and Elizabeth Johnson.  

    Henrietta’s family moved to Kentucky around 1845. 

  •  Across the Bluegrass, Kentuckians celebrated the Memorial Day weekend. 

    As family and friends gathered, it is imperative to remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice protecting our country. 

    The brave men and women who fought and died, defending the freedom we covet as Americans, deserve our respect and gratitude. 

    Collectively, I am sure we all paid tribute and celebrated the true meaning of the upcoming holiday. 

  •  For National Prevention Week, the member of Bullitt County’s drug-free coalition were challenged to write letters to their future selves about what they’re doing today to ensure a healthier tomorrow.

    Dear Future Me,

    *Remember that every choice you make not only affects yourself, but it could be a ripple effect for everyone else. –Sarah Smith

    *Always remember that you are a living example that will either empower or discourage others! –Jonna Naylor

  •  It is your right that should not be taken for granted.

    It is your duty to express your view on who your future leaders should be.

    It is not your right to complain if you are not part of the system.

    Next Tuesday, Bullitt Countians will be encouraged to go out to the polls and vote in the May 22 primary.

    Some of the winners will not face opposition in the fall. Others will.

    For a countywide race, there is little chatter.

    We hope that doesn’t mean that a majority of you plan to sit at home next Tuesday.

  •  During this week of teacher appreciation, the Mount Washington Elementary School PTA wants to acknowledge the staff/faculty for all that they do for our children.

    We want to thank you for your tireless dedication, the smiles that you wear even on your most difficult days, the wisdom you impart, the example you set and the values you instill in our kids.

    You keep our most precious treasures safe and secure, prepared and cared for.

  •  Take a look at BBB's hot topics for May 2018!

  •  We often write about the bad things that happen in Bullitt County.

    The crazy things that government folks tend to do at times.

    The decisions that we question.

    And the criminal acts which are committed.

    However, there is a silver lining that most people familiar with Bullitt County know -- it is a great place to live, work and raise a family.

    This weekend, residents will have three opportunities to get a taste of those good acts.

  •  The Kentucky Derby is a tradition. And another annual tradition is that hundreds of Derby guests make it a point to spend a few days in Bullitt County.

    Many will return year after year.

    Some like the point that hotels are located on Interstate 65 and just a few miles from Churchill Downs.

    Others like that they can visit some great attractions while they are here.

    And still others have just gotten into a routine where they know the hotels, restaurants, gas stations and attractions.

  •  FRANKFORT -- When historians look back on the 2018 legislative session, most of their attention will understandably be focused on three things: the state’s budget, the corresponding tax plan and public-pension reform.

    They didn’t generate every headline, but there’s no doubt they accounted for most.

  •  Elective officials are often caught off guard. Someone will sign up to speak.

    Elective officials by nature want to please the public.

    But, sometimes, they make decisions quickly without fully thinking about all sides of an issue.

    Bullitt Fiscal Court was the most recent example as the members voted three  times on the issue of medical marijuana.

    The pro-medical marijuana troops won the best of three series 2-1.

  •  The Maraman business’s date back to the Maraman Brothers Company, serving Louisville and Shepherdsville and the firm of George W. Maraman & Sons.  In the olden days, funerals were done at the home of the deceased.  In 1940, the residence of Roy L. Maraman was used for the public and became a funeral home.

  •  FRANKFORT --- As legislators were debating Friday night whether to give final approval to a major revenue bill, someone brought up the old joke about how most of us would prefer to fund government: Don’t tax you, don’t tax me; tax that fellow behind the tree.

    Based on that, those supporting this new law must have a large tree in mind, because that’s where they placed 95 percent of us, according to an analysis by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.

  •  We’ve reached the point where signs are going up and advertisements are being placed in the local newspaper.

    We have reached the point where there is less than five weeks until the primary election on May 22.

    As a service to the public, the Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce and The Pioneer News have partnered, with the assistance of city officials in Mount Washington, Lebanon Junction, Shepherdsville and Hillview, to host a series of forums.

  •  It’s that time of year again and the Postal Service, health care providers and animal protection professionals need your help.

    Last year, 6,244 letter carriers were bitten or attacked by dogs nationwide. But that pales in comparison to the more than 4.5 million people — most of them children and the elderly — who are bitten by dogs each year.

    You can help protect your letter carrier, meter reader, newspaper delivery person and neighbors’ children by making sure your pet is properly restrained.

  •  Since our primary job in even-year sessions is writing a 2-year budget, many people consider April 2 the most important day we’ve had thus far.

    That was the day that, for the first time in memory House and Senate agreed on a budget and passed it to the governor in time to consider override of any vetoes he might issue.

  •  FRANKFORT -- The common thread binding all good legislation is that, by the time the actual vote arrives, the outcome is all but a foregone conclusion.

    It takes a lot of effort to get to that point, of course.

    Stakeholders need to be included early on, because they are the ones who will be most affected by any change, and the public must have the chance to weigh in as well.

    It’s a process that can take months, but when it works, the positive impact is measured in years.