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Education

  • Schools only stability for 300 homeless kids

     Instead of starting your morning with breakfast, you start by packing up your things. 

    Your mom says our stay at the hotel is over and we have to find a new place to go.

    You’re late to school again because mom’s car wouldn’t start this morning and you had to find a ride there. 

    She kisses you goodbye telling you everything will be okay, but you’re not so sure.

    Your stomach rumbles, but you’re too late for breakfast. 

  • Celebrating Dr. Seuss

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - Things both great and small come out during Read Across America Week at the Bullitt County Public Schools.

    Many schools, especially at the elementary level, celebrate the week, which takes place annually during the week of March 2, the birthday of children’s author Dr. Seuss.

    Many Roby Elementary students and staff celebrated by dressing as some of their favorite Seuss characters. There were many Thing 1’s and many Thing 2’s

    There was a Lorax and a Tree, Cats in Hats, and even a Grinch sighting.

  • Small-town girl big-time teacher at Nichols Elem.

     NICHOLS - A small-town girl who attended small-town schools knows instinctively how to be a small-town teacher.

    In her fourth year at Nichols Elementary, Brittany Joiner combines updated teaching methods with a sensitivity that allows special relationships with her fourth and fifth grade students.

    Her efforts were recently recognized throughout the district as Joiner was selected the 2017 Bullitt County Elementary Teacher of the Year.

  • College booklet available

     Kentuckians planning for higher education will find “The College Circuit,” a booklet published by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA), to be a useful resource.

    It can be used by students ranging in age from middle school to adults. Parents and counselors can also use it to help their students plan and pay for college. The booklet includes information about careers, college preparation, state and federal financial aid, tips for parents, online resources and a template for setting up a personal college plan.

  • Bernheim students earn honors for work at Jr. Beta state convention

     Bernheim Middle School students Emma Maddox (eighth grade) and Virginia Boyle, Marissa Johns and Leah Johnson (seventh grade) earned honors at the Kentucky Jr. Beta Club convention last month in Lexington.

    Emma’s self-portrait garnered First Place in painting while Virginia, Marisa and Leah placed second in the Book Battle. They were among 38 Bernheim students with 7,000 other youth at the convention.

  • Bullitt Lick renovation plans coming together

      SHEPHERDSVILLE— As the county grows, so do the schools.

    Bullitt Lick Middle is the latest to have plans drawn up for an expansion.

    Cate Noble Ward of Studio Kremer Architects presented to the school board the plans at a recent meeting.

    The front entrance has been designed to bring in more light to the front of the school. It will be angled toward Blue Lick Road to give the school more of a presence, Ward said.

    An upgraded administration suite will cover all staff and SBDM needs, as well as have additional storage. 

  • REMINDER: Schools in session Friday

     Students who enjoy going to school on St. Patrick's Day have the Luck of the Irish with them this year.

    Bullitt County Public Schools will be in session on Friday, Mar. 17. 

    The date was originally scheduled as an off-day on the 2016-17 BCPS, but to be implemented as a make-up date if necessary.

    Schools will still remain closed on Monday, Mar. 20, as originally scheduled.

    For more information contact your school or call 869-8000, or visit www.bullittschools.org.

  • History lesson from a Congressman

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - While U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie was in town to visit the Bullitt County Area Technology Center, he took time to also visit fifth grade students at nearby Roby Elementary.

    With students deep into Civics studies at this time of year, Guthrie primarily discussed the history and functions of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government.

    Following a question/answer session, students received a free booklet featuring the United States Constitution.

  • Federal programs help with college costs

      Federal student aid programs can help pay college costs.

    The federal government sponsors numerous financial aid programs that can help students and their parents pay college expenses. 

    This brief summary from the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) describes the more common federal grant and loan programs. 

    Grants generally do not have to be repaid, but loans do.

    Federal Pell Grant: Pell Grants provide up to $5,815 per year for undergraduates with financial need. The amount may change this year.

  • Three schools, Three dramas all in one night

     Recently, students with all three high schools presented one-act plays for a very receptive audience.

    Bullitt Central’s auditorium was home to two nights of drama.

    Bullitt Central’s drama department presented Drop Dead, Juliet.

    According to teacher Sara Anderson, the play is a take-off of the William Shakespeare class.

    The Bullitt East Thespians Society 5689 performed Cagebirds by David Campton on Friday and Harlequin Holds the Bag by David and Susan Grote on Saturday, according to drama teacher Daniel Barrett.